The Aromatica Australia 2019 Conference on the Gold Coast

Hello natural beauties I hope you’re all well and happy. I had a fabulous weekend on the Gold Coast in Australia at the Aromatica Australia 2019 conference. Here’s my little movie so you get an idea of how energetic it was.

Buy my 100% natural and organic botanical perfumes, and paperback book here:

suzannerbanks.com.au

                     Digital downloads and paper backs of my book                              Revelation! Reveal your Destiny with Essentials Oils here:

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

I barely had time to do any filming as I needed to shop (of course), chat and eat. The day’s agendas were jam packed, so stay tuned next time I’ll tell you about each presenter and their talk.

Please forgive all my “fantastics” and “amazings”. I was feeling inspired and excited and tired and busy.

There is a bright future for aromatherapy and essential oils but we must look at sustainability and absolutely be more aware of where our money goes. Plant medicine and nutrition will always connect us to the earth. We must look after our planet.

Emily Dickinson’s Herbarium

Hello dearest natural beauties wherever you are! I recently found a beautiful article on the American poet Emily Dickinson. The article talks about her love of flowers and her craft of growing, collecting, pressing and recording them in books. Her ‘herbarium” is a 60 page collection of around 400 flowers from the Amherst region in Massachusetts. The original article from Maria Popova for  brainpickings.org can be found here.

Buy my 100% natural and organic botanical perfumes, and paperback book here:

suzannerbanks.com.au

                     Digital downloads and paper backs of my book                              Revelation! Reveal your Destiny with Essentials Oils here:

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

_____________________________________________________________________________

Page from Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)

“Dickinson started studying botany at the age of nine and assisting her mother at the garden at twelve, but it wasn’t until she began attending Mount Holyoke in her late teens — around the time the only authenticated daguerrotype of her was taken — that she began approaching her botanical zeal with scientific rigor.”

brainpickings.org “Emily Dickinson’s Herbarium” by Maria popova

Emily Dickinson, daguerreotype, ca. 1847. (Amherst College Archives & Special Collections, gift of Millicent Todd Bingham, 1956)

Page from Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)
First page of Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)

The article also quotes another author, Judith Farr, in her book The Gardens of Emily Dickinson . Farr makes an important note about the first page of Dickinson’s herbarium:

On the very first page, the first flower pressed by the girl Emily, was the Jasminum or jasmine, the tropical flower that would come to mean passion to her as a woman. This “belle of Amherst,” … was profoundly attracted to the foreign and especially to the semitropical or tropical climes that she read about in Harper’s and the Atlantic Monthly-Santo Domingo, Brazil, Potosi, Zanzibar, Italy… Domesticating the jasmine in the cold climate of New England, writing sensuous lyrics about forbidden love in spare meters, Dickinson followed a paradoxical pattern that related poet to gardener in one adventurous pursuit. Just as her fondness for buttercups, clover, anemones, and gentians spoke of an attraction to the simple and commonplace, her taste for strange exotic blooms is that of one drawn to the unknown, the uncommon, the aesthetically venturesome.

Judith Farr “The Gardens of Emily Dickinson”
Page from Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)

The page below collects 8 different types of violets – how divine!

Violet varieties from Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)
Page from Emily Dickinson’s herbarium (Houghton Library, Harvard University)

The 60 page herbarium book can be viewed here. 

I really hope you enjoy it!

Kohler’s Beautiful Botanical Books and Illustrations

I absolutely love vintage botanical illustrations. And there’s no better reference and guide than Kohler’s Medicinal Plants, published in German in 1883. They are now in the public domain which means you can use them without paying royalties.  I’ve also included a link so you can download them all too. Here’s a few plants I love …

 

***********************************************************************************************

Buy my 100% natural and organic botanical perfumes, and paperback book here: suzannerbanks.com.au

Digital downloads of my book Revelation! Reveal your Destiny with Essentials Oils:

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

***********************************************************************************************

“Köhler’s Medicinal Plants is an abbreviated English rendering of the book title Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen in naturgetreuen Abbildungen mit kurz erläuterndem Texte : Atlas zur Pharmacopoea germanica etc.. This is a German rare medicinal guide published by the company Franz Eugen Köhler from 1883 to 1914 in Gera. The first complete edition in three volumes was published in 1887. It was mainly written by Hermann Adolph Köhler (1834-79), edited by Gustav Pabst, and contains some 300 full-page chromolithography plates by the illustrators Walther Otto Müller, C.F. Schmidt, and K. Gunther.”

Wikipedia

 

Calendula officianalis

 

Cocos nucifera

 

Citrus aurantium

 

Lavandula angustifolia

 

 

Iris germanica

 

Picea abies

 

Download the volumes here: 

https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/623#/summary

 

Do you love vintage illustrations? Hard not too really!