Softly and Gently with the Chamomiles

Roman chamomile Anthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile

Roman chamomile Anthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile

What a pretty flower! I always loved daisies as a child, and the chamomiles belong to this species called Asteraceae or Compositae. Chamomile is famous for it’s soothing nature and tranquil effects, and is used in both herbal medicine and aromatherapy alike. I’ve always thought of Aromatherapy as a specialist part of herbal medicine, powerful because it insists we use our sense of smell for healing and interacting with the world.

1. Roman Chamomile 

Anthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile

This chamomile has a sweet honey like aroma, and appeals to many people because of this softness. Roman chamomile is usually found in a 3% jojoba blend because of its price. It is often overlooked in favour of German chamomile but please give it a try. It is one of those oils that gives an immediate reaction of bliss.

In aromatherapy Roman chamomile is the one used as an anti-spasmodic treatment, an tonic for unclenching, that may also help the smooth muscle of the gut relax. Also great for muscle spasm and tension and general fatigue and stress.

Best of all, I like to use Roman chamomile as a perfume straight from the bottle. No doubt people will be attracted to you when you wear this oil as you will smell divine and will be radiating a sense of calm and knowingness. Try these recipes

“Floatin’ on a Cloud”

For release of gripping tension and pain in the body make an oil blend with 3 teaspoons of carrier oil and add:

Roman Chamomile 3%      8 drops

Marjoram                           2 drops

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“Venus”

As a pulse point perfume mix these drops together and anoint your chosen spot –  for attracting and resonating with a goddess-like energy

Roman Chamomile 3 %    3 drops

Rosewood                        2 drops

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German chamomile - Matricaria chamomilla or Matricaria recutita)

German chamomile – Matricaria chamomilla or Matricaria recutita)

2. German Chamomile

This tiny little flower is a different genus to Roman chamomile and what sets it apart from most oils is its blue colour. During the distillation process, one of the consituents – chamazulene – is changed to give a deep blue hue to the oil. This oil is best used as an anti-inflammatory and works well with lavender in this sense. It is great for stress, anxiety, and any tension in the body. It is a strongly scented herbaceous oil and I would not say this is an oil to use as a perfume. Think BLUE – think COOLING! A good oil for joints and muscles as well as an over thinking mind. German chamomile is more readily found then Roman chamomile and will also be in a 3% jojoba blend. Try these remedies:

“Release”

For a treatment of painful joints make an oil blend with 3 teaspoons of carrier oil, rub over the joint and cover with a bandage. Rest. Add these essential oils to create your treatment:

German chamomile  3%   8 drops

Lavender                          2 drops

Peppermint                       1 drop

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“Cocoon”

After a stressful day stop your mind from over-processing by mixing the following into a little container and rubbing on your temples and third eye. Remember to put a little of the oil residue inside your nose to gain maximum benefit, and dilute with a few drops of carrier oil.

German Chamomile           2 drops

Orange                               2 drops

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The chamomiles are your ancient tool for stress release.

Remember to use your intention when you make your blends to give extra power and personality to the formula.  For more information on intention see my article What Do I Mean when I Say “Use Your Intention”?

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

Deep, Cool, Grounding Vetiver

Hairy vetiver root

Hairy vetiver root

Vetiver essential oil (Vetiveria zizanoides) is steam distilled from the root or “rhizome” of the plant. As you can see from the pic above the rhizome is hairy and fine, exposing as much surface area as possible to the surrounding soil. This scent of vetiver is similar to damp soil, although this is a simplification. It is an essential oil that is used extensively in perfume as a “fixative”: bringing all the scents together and binding or fixing them into a cohesive blend. It is used in many scents for men due it’s strong, deep, smoky aroma- but having said that it is also used in women’s perfumes too.

In aromatherapy it is therapeutically used for many things, and is also used the bind a formula together. I would use 1 drop of vetiver in a formula to make this possible. The most important thing to remember about vetiver is that the scent is so strong, less is more! One drop is enough in a small oil blend for your body.

less IS more via zazzle.com

less IS more via zazzle.com

I would chose one or two drops of vetiver to treat a client who is unsure, confused, overwhelmed and spends too much time in their head. It is often referred to as a “grounding” oil as it has the ability to draw energy into the ground. Patchouli works in a similar way too. Hysteria, especially in kids, can be stopped immediately with a drop of vetiver oil. You could do this by placing a drop in your hands, rub them together, and smooth all over the energetic body – ensuring your child gets to smell the oil. It’s the scent of the oil, traveling through the nasal epithelium and into the brain, that makes this possible. With aromatherapy, the scent is of the oil has one of the most powerful effects, and using them in a mist is a lovely way to do it.

use a drop of vetiver on a screaming child

use a drop of vetiver on a screaming child

Here are a few recipes using vetiver oil:

Chill Baby

for a mist that will help anyone chill out – in a 50ml mist bottle

orange    15 drops

lavender    8 drops

vetiver       2 drops

I’m Freaking Out (I need to Get Myself Together)

for a body oil blend to nourish your skin and help you calm down – in 3 teaspoons of carrier oil add

rosewood      2 drops

mandarin        4 drops

vetiver             1 drop

Oh No I Think I’m Sunburnt!

for a body oil blend to cool your skin  – in 3 teaspoons of carrier oil add

rose in jojoba   12 drops

vetiver               1 drops

Vetiver is sometimes referred to as “The Oil of Tranquility”, especially in India where it is commonly used, and produced. If you just remember this little phrase you will automatically know what to use vetiver oil for. It can also be used in hair care and skincare as a moisturiser for dry skin, and you can use any essential oil as an antiseptic.

The last time I was in Bali a shop was selling the root, and the scent was absolutely divine. I have read that the root is dampened and hung in windows to cool everyone down. The mild scent of the root is just a hint of what the power of the oil smells like.The essential oil is strong so use sparingly!

Remember to treat yourself first, then everyone will benefit.