The Wonders of Wintergreen

Thanks for tuning in again natural beauties. This week a client and friend brought me a gift from the USA – Wintergreen Life Savers. She had promised she would bring some back to me so I could have a taste – and had been inspired to do this after I used wintergreen in an oil blend for one of her treatments. She said that this lolly was a blast from the past and a loved candy from her childhood.

 

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Please check out my book REVELATION! – Reveal Your Destiny with Essential Oils

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

and many other stores worldwide as an ebook and paperback

**************************************************************************************************************

 

As you can see from the comment in my pic above – wintergreen as a flavouring for a candy is very unusual for me (and I would think many Aussies too). To me it’s like eating a sports rub like Deep Heat or Dencorub. It is commonly used as a flavouring in America, but I’m not sure if it’s embraced the same way in other parts of the world. After the initial blast and sensation of the essential oil of wintergreen in my mouth, the fragrance subsided into a general sweetness. Phew.

Some of my classic aromatherapy text books warn against using this oil at all, which seems strange when you can eat it in a lolly )this is however, at an extremely low dosage). Wintergreen is an essential oil of warmth, expansion and healing and can be used in an external oil blend for:

  • sore muscles
  • a chest cough
  • a headache
  • tension
  • poor circulation

I think the reason this oil is misunderstood is that some texts say it is high in the same chemical constituents that are in aspirin – but that’s not quite true. It has a high concentration of methyl salicylate ……

“Methyl salicylate is good for some people, not for others. A blanket contraindication is not necessary, but it is best avoided in pregnancy – all salicylates are teratogenic in sufficient amount, including methyl salicylate and aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid). Methyl salicylate must be absolutely avoided by anyone taking blood-thinning drugs, as it increases the action of the drug, and this causes blood to leak into tissues and  internal bruising occurs.

 

Wintergreen oil has some wonderful properties, but I would not like to see it used at more than 5%.”

 

Robert Tisserand

 

wintergreen - Gaultheria procumbens

wintergreen – Gaultheria procumbens

 

NB: As Robert Tisserand says above, he would not recommend using this at a higher concentration then 5%. Well 5% is a very high concentration in aromatherapy as mostly our oil blends are a standard 2.5%.

I have used this oil with an elderly client who is on blood thinners and it really helps him with back pain. I don’t use it all the time and when I do make a blend I always add other oils too.

Common sense and intuition must always play a part when you use essential oils. One size does not fit all. 

 

Here are a few recipes for an oil blend at 2.5%

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil. It’s always best to patch test first, before you apply all over.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

 

Wintergreen with frost - pic via http://tcpermaculture.com/

Wintergreen with frost – pic via http://tcpermaculture.com/

 

“BRRR I’m Freezing”

Wintergreen     1 drop

Lemon             7 drops

 


 

“The Anti Cough”

Wintergreen         2 drops

Marjoram             2 drops

Frankincense     4 drops

 


 

“Period Pain-Away”

Wintergreen     2 drops

Lavender         4 drops

Peppermint     1 drop

 


 

“Oh My Aching Knees”

Wintergreen     3 drops

Ginger             3ginger drops

Cypress          2 drops

 


Do you like wintergreen?

Remember to treat yourself first, then everyone will benefit.

Check out my YouTube channel too, thanks.

copyright-2017

Essential Oils for Winter Wellness

Warm up in winter with essential oils

Warm up in winter with essential oils

It must seem strange to all my northern hemisphere readers that I’d be writing about this subject now. Well it is winter for us in the southern hemisphere, so next week I’ll do an article on essential oils for summer so you guys don’t miss out.

What essential oils to use for winter …… hmmm?

Flowering rosemary in my client's garden

Flowering rosemary in my client’s garden

1. Rosemary

Why?

* Stimulates blood circulation, good for those with cold hands and feet (used in a body oil)

* Works against catarrh and congestion (used in a body oil or a drop in a steam inhalation)

* Works a pain reliever for sore muscles and for aching rheumatic joints (used in a body oil)

* Stimulates the brain and memory so it can wake you up on a cold winter’s day (used in a steam inhalation or a shower steam)

Warming, spicy ginger

Warming, spicy ginger

2. Ginger

Why?

* Warming to the digestive fire and the body in general (used in a body oil)

* Alleviates catarrh (used in a body oil or steam inhalation)

* Soft and gentle to treat people who are very sick with a cold or flu and may help stimulate appetite (diffuse in the sick room or use as a body oil)

Lemon myrtle flower- pic via www.lemonmyrtle.com.au

Lemon myrtle flower- pic via http://www.lemonmyrtle.com.au

3. Lemon Myrtle

Why?

* highly anti-bacterial and anti-viral (diffuse this oil in the home or office to help prevent YOU from getting what THEY have)

* use lemongrass or lemon as a substitute if you can’t find lemon myrtle oil

 

 

Eucalyptus globulus is the most commonly produced essential oil although there are quite a few - pic via www.wildseedtasmania.com.au

Eucalyptus globulus is the most commonly produced essential oil although there are quite a few – pic via http://www.wildseedtasmania.com.au

4. Eucalyptus

Why?

* the number one oil to break down mucous in the sinuses and lungs (used in a steam inhalation and diffuse in the sick room)

* an expectorant (used in a steam inhalation)

* generally helps easier breathing (diffuse in the sick room) and may also help throat inflammation

 

Sage - use in small amounts

Sage – use in small amounts

5. Sage

* analgesic for a sore throat (used as a body oil or a drop in a steam inhalation)

* Clary sage can also be used for a sore throat (used as a body oil or a drop in a steam inhalation)

Ah lovely lavender

Ah lovely lavender

6. Lavender

Why?

* general aches and pains from the cold and/or sickness (used in a body oil or diffused in the sick room)

* analgesic for a sore throat  (a drop in a steam inhalation)

* analgesic in general for headaches and other inflammatory symptoms (diffuse in the sick room and in a body oil)

The fennel plant

The fennel plant

7. Fennel

Why?

* helps with catarrh and lung congestion acting as an expectorant (use in a body oil)

* acts as an analgesic in coughs and colds (used in a body oil)

* digestive tonic to calm an upset stomach (diffuse in the sick room or in a body oil)

 

As you can see these oils can help you feel a bit better if you get sick in winter, or warm you up when your feet are freezing, or help clear the air of unwanted germs.

If you have a few people in your home, especially if you have kids, I recommend you diffuse oils in your home at night during winter not only to create a lovely scented atmosphere, but to lend a little bit of anti-bacterial magic to the mix. Of course when using essential oils they will not necessarily cure an infection or disease, but they can help you feel a little better and more comfortable too.

Remember to treat yourself first, then everyone will benefit.

Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas. See my article about intention

copyright suzanne

 

 

10 Recipes with Roman Chamomile Essential Oil – Anthemis nobilis

Chamomile - sweet flower, sweet scent

Chamomile – sweet flower, sweet scent

My last post went into a bit more detail about the beautiful essential oil of Roman Chamomile, so for a bit of background click here to check it out. Then lets get into some recipes!

An important note here is about how you are likely to buy this oil. As it tends to be one of the more expensive essential oils, you may find it in a 3% jojoba blend. For more info on this kind of essential oil see my article  3% blends in jojoba.

I’ll do a few recipes with 100% essential oil and a few with 3% in jojoba.

Recipes using Roman chamomile 3% in Jojoba

1. Pure Pulse Point Perfume

In a little dish mix these oils and anoint your pulse points or chakras always patch test first!

“Divine”

Use straight from the bottle as a pure perfume and I promise you will not be disappointed by the scent

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“Serene”

Anoint yourself before meditation –

Roman chamomile 3%      4 drops

Frankincense                     1 drop

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“Angels Please Surround Me”

Roman chamomile 3%      3 drops

Rose Geranium                 1 drop

Bergamot                          1 drop

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“Soothe and Comfort”

For you or someone who needs it –

Roman chamomile 3%       4 drops

Rose 3%                            2 drops

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A clay face mask is the best and most natural clarifyng mask. pic vis chiclooking.com

A clay face mask is the best and most natural clarifyng mask. pic vis chiclooking.com

2. Face Mask

Usually add 1 or 2 drops of oil to some clay and add water, floral water or hydrosol

Roman chamomile 3%   3 drops

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Recipes using Roman chamomile essential oil 100% pure

Nourish your body with a beautiful oil blend - pic via redbookmag.com

Nourish your body with a beautiful oil blend – pic via redbookmag.com

1. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

“From Hot to Cool”

To soothe tired skin and muscles –

Roman chamomile   2 drops

Marjoram                 3 drops

Lavender                 3 drops

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“Marshmallows”

For soft, lovely skin –

Roman chamomile    3 drops

Pink grapefruit           2 drops

Palmarosa                 1 drop

Patchouli                   1 drop

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Just use any mist bottle you can find

Just use any mist bottle you can find

2. Personal Aura Cleansing Mist & Room Mist

In a 50ml mist bottle filled with water add 25 drops of oil

(depending on the packaging you have, you may need to use a little alcohol -like vodka- at the bottom of your bottle first, so the oils disperse into smaller drops to prevent clogging the atomiser top. I’ve found sometimes it works just with water, and sometimes it doesn’t – very annoying!)

“De-Stress”

Roman chamomile         8 drops

Cedarwood Virginiana    6 drops

Orange                          8 drops

Nutmeg                         3 drops

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“Pink Bubbles”

Surround and protect yourself with Shakti Gawain’s pink bubble of love –

Roman chamomile       7 drops

Mandarin                      8 drops

Cinnamon                     6 drops

Vanilla CO2                  4 drops * see my article for more info on CO2 extracts What are CO2 Extracts in the World of Aromatherapy?

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“Petit”

Let big problems become small problems –

Roman chamomile       8 drops

Juniper                         8 drops

Lime                             8 drops

Vetiver                          1 drop

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Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas.See my article about intention.

copyright suzanne

 

 

The Divine Scent of Roman Chamomile Essential Oil

Anthemis nobilis - a classic illustation from Kohler's Medicial Pflanzen

Anthemis nobilis – a classic illustration from Kohler’s Medicinal Pflanzen

I have brushed over the chamomiles previously but would love to go into more detail about Roman chamomile. You can check out my previous blog Softly and Gently with the Chamomiles, but lets go into the world of this special, petit fluer in this article.

As with many plants this chamomile has a couple of botanical names – Anthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile. Either way you can pick up that it is considered a nobile plant – distinguished by rank and manner. It is part of the Asteracae family (daisies) and the genus Chamaemelum. I’ve always loved daisies because they are so sweet, simple and pretty. This chamomile also has a very pretty scent and the essential oil is magnificent! For a small flower the scent is BIG!

This scent greatly differs from the other chamomile used in Aromatherapy – German chamomile – which is much darker in colour, darker and heavier in scent too. Our beautiful little “Roman” daisy will appeal to everyone from kids to the elderly, and even our pets.

Chamomile - sweet flower, sweet scent

Chamomile – sweet flower, sweet scent

It’s hard to tell the chamomiles apart as a flower but the German chamomile tends to have a more prominent pointed centre with leaves pointing downward, whereas the Roman chamomile flower is generally more balanced and larger, with a flat centre and daisy-like leaves. This is a generalisation and I’m sure the gardeners out there will have something to say about that!

In Aromatherapy today Roman chamomile is used;

* for stomach cramps as it is a great anti-spasmodic

* as a stomach calming oil in general

* as a calming oil in all respects – both physically and mentally

* as a soothing tonic to overwrought emotions

* as a calming oil for children

* for headaches

* for period pain

* for any kind of cramping whether it be in the body, the emotions, the mind or the energetic body

* in body oil blends and treatments for red, inflamed skin

Roman chamomile - pic via 3morganic.com

Roman chamomile – pic via 3morganic.com

I find it difficult to describe scent but I would say that this oil is sweet and intoxicating, with honey-like tones. This is a description from Wikipedia –

“The word chamomile, and the genus name Chamaemelum come from the Greek χαμαίμηλον (chamaimēlon), “earth-apple”, from χαμαί (chamai), “on the ground” + μήλον (mēlon), “apple”, so-called because of the apple-like scent of the plant. “

I suppose it has an apple-like scent but at least this gives you an idea and also indicates how long this plant has been around.

According to chamomile.co.uk/history.htm

“Chamomile was known to the Romans and used for incense and in beverages. Ironically, the name ‘Roman Chamomile’ by which it is sometimes known, does not stem from this time, but from a rather arbitary naming of the herb in the 19th century by a plant collector who happened to find some growing in the Colleseum in Rome!”

 

This site also refers to the use of chamomile in Egypt for treatment of fever but as we know it was various monasteries throughout Europe who consolidated the use of many herbs in the Middle Ages and who’s recipes still exist today in alcoholic beverages and perfumes.

Old medicine = good medicine!

Stay tuned for some recipes with this stunning essential oil which is more commonly retailed in a 3% blend in jojoba. This way we can use it straight from the bottle and it makes a wonderful perfume on it’s own. Fore more info on 3% blends check out my story here.

copyright suzanne

 

 

 

Lavender – Simple and Complicated All at the Same Time

Lavender rules the essential oil library

Lavender rules the essential oil library

The scent and uses of lavender are the easy bits to understand. What’s a little more complicated is the different types of lavender and where they are grown. There’s English lavender, French lavender, Australian lavender, New Zealand lavender, Bulgarian lavender and so much more. Some of these lavenders are the same botanical species and others are different. There’s Spike lavender and Lavandin too so what does it all mean when it comes to essential oils?

 

Lavandula angustifolia from Köhler's Medizinal Pflanzen

Lavandula angustifolia from Köhler’s Medizinal Pflanzen

True Lavender/English Lavender;   Lavandula angustifolia

Lavender essential oil usually refers to any of the botanical lavenders in general but the most commonly grown lavender for essential oil production is Lavandula angustifolia – sometimes referred to as “true lavender”. This used to be called Lavandula officianalis which is an older classification, and is also still called English Lavender. I have also seen this oil called “fine lavender”.

A typical analysis of this oil shows a high linalyl acetate and linalool content. This accounts for the scent of lavender among many things, and linalool has also been shown to have a calming action. As for most essential oils, there may be a few primary chemicals but there are often many other constituents. It is the oil as a whole that gives it a unique character.

I have two different bottles of Lavandula angustifolia wild harvested from the same island off the Yugoslav republic. They have slightly different scents even though it’s the same plant, it just comes from a different area.

Spike lavender - pic via www.cadima.com

Spike lavender – pic via http://www.cadima.com

Spike Lavender;   Lavandula latifolia

This lavender is Lavandula latifolia and is also grown for essential oil production. It can also be classified as Lavandula spica and the difference between this lavender and true lavender is the chemical composition. Spike lavender is much higher in camphor and also 1-8 cineole (high in eucalyptus oil). It is more pungent and the scent of camphor is strong.

This variety is grown in Spain, Portugal and France and they do vary in scent. I haven’t used or smelled Spanish Spike Lavender, but is is claimed by two Aromatherapists I admire, that the French Spike lavender is a lot softer and sweeter than the Spanish oil. The French oil has less camphor. It is interesting to note here that there are many ways an oil can vary in scent even when it is the same cultivar. The makeup of the soil and local temperatures play a big role in these variations.

True lavender tends to be the prettier plant with a prettier scent.

Lavandin and true lavender- ic via www.marvellous-provence.com

Lavandin and true lavender- ic via http://www.marvellous-provence.com

 

Lavandin;   Lavandula x intermedia

Lavandin is grown in France but I’m not sure where else! It is a cross between Lavandula latifolia  and Lavandula angustifolia. It s often used in place of lavender in body products, and any lavender product you can think of. I have a huge bottle of lavandin a friend recently brought back from France and it’s lovely. It has more camphor then true lavender so I have been using it as I would spike lavender. I would say lavandin and spike lavender oils are great for warming for muscles, aches and pains and to move cold energy out of the body.

ah lavender!

ah lavender!

 

This only scrapes the surface of all the lavender out there and if you’re a gardener you’ll know this is somewhat simplified. These are the main lavenders used for essential oil production and I love and use them all!

 

 

 

 

Peppermint Oil! An Oldie but a Goodie!

Ah lovely peppermint - pic via thebodyhut.com.au

Ah lovely peppermint – pic via thebodyhut.com.au

Peppermint essential oil is usually Mentha piperita and comes from the family Lamiacae, and the genus Mentha. A supplier of mine also offers Mentha arvensis, but really when it comes down to it the variations won’t make a huge difference to the therapeutic value for most users of oils.This family also holds many herbs like lavender, sage, marjoram, patchouli, oregano, thyme and many others. It seems as though this family of plants has been around for thousands of years going back to, at least, the Romans, the Greeks, and it is even recorded in Egyptian records. These are hardy herbs and have wonderful medicinal properties.

Please see my article Essential Oils from Herbs are Spectacular for a more comprehensive list of healing herbs. I’ll be concentrating on these herbs over the next few weeks so stay tuned.

Peppermint lollies - pic via health.com

Peppermint lollies – pic via health.com

Peppermint essential oil is one of the most used oils in the world and this is because it’s use in food flavourings. Peppermint lollies are sweet, cute and fun and for all these reasons I also see peppermint essential oil as an oil of happiness. It appeals to many people, both young and old and is an easily accessible and inexpensive oil.

A typical analysis of peppermint oil shows it is high in menthol and menthane, and these constituents are the ones that give peppermint its heat. Funnily enough this warmth or heat actually translates to a cool feeling, and peppermint could be considered and anti-inflammatory oil.

Peppermint oil is used in aromatherapy today –

* as an antidote for nausea and travel sickness

* to help calm symptoms of irritable bowel (via products that contain peppermint oil)

* as a pain relief for muscles and nerve pains

* as a decongestant for the sinuses

 

Most people love peppermint - pic via www.milkandhoneyherbs.com

Most people love peppermint – pic via http://www.milkandhoneyherbs.com

I use peppermint oil –

* in a steam inhalation to relieve a headache (it really works well) and sinus headaches and pain

* and in any blend of oils to relieve pain – menstrual pain, muscle pain, aching limbs, arthritis pain

I would not use peppermint oil in many body oils, but I have added it to a blend for a client with psoriasis and eczema and it seems to cool her itchy skin.

Peppermint is good for pain!

It’s also great to clear your mind, wake you up and to make you feel refreshed. It will even do that when you have a good quality mint in your mouth.

Try these recipes –

Take a huge whiff to change your focus in seconds

Take a huge whiff to change your focus in seconds

1. Open The Bottle and Take a Huge Whiff

Peppermint will help with a headache, sinus congestion and a tired mind.

2. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and  “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

“Calm Down”

For itchy skin or even an irritable feeling –

Peppermint   1 drop

Lavender       4 drops

Patchouli       2 drops

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5. Scent Your Space

In a traditional oil burner with a candle or a diffuser add 25 drops of oil

“Happy la la”

Clear the air and make room for some happy vibes –

Peppermint        8 drops

Orange             17 drops

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Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas. See my article about intention.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

 

 

 

 

Ease Coughs, Colds and Sore Throats with Essential Oils

Please check out my new book REVELATION! – Reveal Your Destiny with Essential Oils

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

and many other stores worldwide as a Kindle and Paperback

 


Ease Coughs, Colds and Sore Throats with Essential Oils

 

Colds and flu come with winter (pic via thepaintedskin.com)

Colds and flu come with winter (pic via thepaintedskin.com)

Ah yes the dreaded lurgy has got me.

First – not feeling so great.

Then – a congested throat.

Then – a sore throat and headache.

Then – can’t move a muscle lying in bed.

Then – coughing and a couple more days in bed.

I confess I used some cold and flu tablets to ease the symptoms one day, but it’s the use of essential oils that can make you feel a bit better too.

My top 4 are Lavender, Marjoram, Fennel, and Eucalyptus

Try these simple and effective ways to help with the symptoms of a cold.

Lavender

lovely lavender

lovely lavender

By now you’ll know I use Lavender for lots of things and we all know through the traditional uses for lavender over the centuries are those for soothing and relieving pain.

1. A few drops on a cold compress on the forehead can give some relief for general sickness and of course a headache and head tension due to coughing.

compress on forehead - easy and effective

compress on forehead – easy and effective

2. A couple of drops in a steam inhalation for a sore throat (breathe through your mouth) and headaches.

steam inhalation

steam inhalation

3. A few drops in a bath to relieve muscle tension.

4. A drop on the temples to bring a sense of relief.

5. Nourishing oil blend for aches and pains in the body – 7 drops in 3 teaspoons of a carrier oil like olive, almond or sunflower.

6. A couple of drops externally on the throat to help with symptoms of a sore throat and sore muscle from coughing.

****** Always remember to smell the oils too, as this will help the brain receive information from the oil and translate it into action.

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Marjoram

Marjoram - another great herb from the same family as lavender

Marjoram – another great herb from the same family as lavender

Marjoram is also an age-old remedy for many ailments. It’s particularly good for muscle pain and easing a cough.

1. A couple of drops in a steam inhalation for a cough (breathe through your mouth). This will not stop the cough if your lungs are infected as the cough’s purpose will be to rid the lungs of mucous. This works better for a dry cough and ticklish throat.

2. A few drops in a bath to relieve muscle tension.

3. Nourishing oil blend for aches and pains in the body – 7 drops in 3 teaspoons of a carrier oil like olive, almond or sunflower.

4. 4 drops marjoram and 3 drops lavender in 3 teaspoons of carrier oil specifically to use externally on your throat as a pain reliever.

Mix lavender and marjoram for a synergistic formula to help with aches and pains either in a bath or oil blend. They work well together for coughs too.

****** Always remember to smell the oils too, as this will help the brain receive information from the oil and translate it into action.

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Fennel

fennel flower

fennel flower

I recently wrote about fennel as it’s a great oil for winter. It’s warming and soothing and helps nurture you in the cold.

Fennel works best as a decongestant for the lungs so if you have a weird taste in your mouth when you cough, chances are sometime soon you may be coughing up green stuff. Fennel is the oil to get it moving and also works well with marjoram and lavender.

1. A couple of drops in a steam inhalation for a congested chest (breathe through your mouth).

2. A couple of drops externally on the throat to help with symptoms of a cough and to move the mucous.

3. Nourishing oil blend for aches and pains in the body – 7 drops in 3 teaspoons of a carrier oil like olive, almond or sunflower. Mix fennel with lavender in this case to help your chest – 4 drops of fennel and 3 drops of lavender.

****** Always remember to smell the oils too, as this will help the brain receive information from the oil and translate it into action.

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Eucalyptus

eucalyptus globulus

eucalyptus globulus

THE oil for breaking down mucous!

1. A couple of drops in a steam inhalation for a congested chest (breathe through your mouth) and congested sinuses (breathe through your nose).

steam inhalation

steam inhalation

2. As a treatment for you in your space – simply add about 15 drops to a large bowl of boiling water (like you would with a steam inhalation) and bring it into your bedroom while you rest in bed. Or in the lounge room while you’re on the couch. This is an easy one if you are by yourself as it doesn’t take too much effort.

You can use all the oils above in this way and of course put them in a vapouriser – eucalyptus oil working particularly well as a decongestant. Plus it’s refreshing and you can almost feel it doing you good. Some bush healing never goes astray.

I could talk about other oils too but if in doubt, or if you only have one oil, use lavender.

absolutely stunning lavender fields via reddit.com

absolutely stunning lavender fields via reddit.com

REST and lots of fluids too will help move the infection through your body and check out these articles for blending ratios too –  “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”.

 

copyright suzannerbanks 2013