10 Recipes with Ginger Essential Oil – Zingiber officinale

Please check out my new book REVELATION! – Reveal Your Destiny with Essential Oils

Barnes & Noble      Booktopia AU      Amazon UK

and many other stores worldwide as a Kindle and Paperback


10 Recipes with Ginger Essential Oil – Zingiber officinale

Beautiful ginger

Beautiful ginger

To me ginger essential oil is an oil that doesn’t necessarily smell how you think it will – especially if you have eaten eat before, or drunk tea with fresh ginger in it. Like black pepper essential oil, ginger is a spice oil that is a lot more gentle that the plant itself. It is soft and warming, slightly reminiscent of rosemary, with a spicy undertone that can take a few seconds to vapourise.

I’m writing about ginger today because yesterday I had my regular aromatherapy treatment and I was given ginger, orange and, um …. something else (I can’t remember now), and it was gorgeous!

In aromatherapy ginger essential oil is used:

* externally on the stomach for nausea

* as a general warming tonic

* to increase circulation to the extremities (important with people who have diabetes)

I use ginger oil metaphysically to help clients or friends (or myself), particularly when the emotions are stuck and a cold. Ginger is a great way to soften your emotions ans help you to become more approachable in your relationships, and may even help with finding your true purpose in life.

Here are some recipes:

An essential oil steam in the shower will do wonders for your mind and energy levels - pic via completehealthcircle.com

An essential oil steam in the shower will do wonders for your mind and energy levels – pic via completehealthcircle.com

1. Put A few Drops Of Oil into the bottom of the Shower

This works in a similar way to just taking a whiff straight from the bottle, but if you’ve got an extra minute, it will give you a completely different experience. Your whole body will be immersed in an essential oil steam. Just cover the drain with a cloth or your foot for a couple of minutes and breathe in the medicinal goodness


Check this out - an oil burner made from a can - pic via www.instructables.com

Check this out – an oil burner made from a can – pic via http://www.instructables.com

2. Scent Your Space

In a traditional oil burner with a candle or a diffuser add 25 drops of oil

“Job Interview Magic”

The evening before your interview immerse yourself in this –

Ginger                     10 drops

Petitgrain                   5 drops

Mandarin                   5 drops

Cedarwood Virginian  5 drops


“Change of Season”

Ginger can help you move through weather changes –

Ginger             8 drops

Lavender         9 drops

Frankincense     8 drops


 

“Let’s All Get Along Tonight”

Calm those crazy kids –

Ginger             9 drops

Orange          10 drops

Geranium        4 drops

Vetiver             2 drops


 

Rub oil into your body - it's good!

Rub oil into your body – it’s good!

3. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil. It’s always best to patch test first, before you apply all over.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3″

“Sooooo Cold”

Warm up –

Ginger       3 drops

Rosemary  2 drops

Lemon       4 drops


 

“Pre-Workout Warmer”

Ginger       3 drops

Marjoram   2 drops

Grapefruit  2 drops


“High Seas”

If you’re feeling nauseous or travel sick –

Ginger          3 drops

Peppermint   2 drops

Fennel           2 drops


Chinese tea cup - perfect for a little perfume magic

Chinese tea cup – perfect for a little perfume magic

4. Pure Pulse Point Perfume

In a little dish mix these oils and anoint your pulse points or chakras – 3 drops of essential oils and dilute with a few drops of carrier oil – always patch test first!

“I Like Myself Today”

Ginger       1 drops

Rose 3%    3 drops  *see my article for more info on 3% blends in jojoba


“Kindness, Kindness, Kindness”

Ginger              1 drop

Lemon myrtle   1 drop

Lime                 1 drop


“Empathy”

Ginger         2 drops

Ylang Ylang  1 drop


Warming ginger root

Warming ginger root

Please embrace ginger essential oil – hopefully you’ll love it as much as I do.

Remember to treat yourself first, then everyone will benefit.

Check out my YouTube channel too, thanks.

copryright SR Banks 2015

10 Recipes with Lemongrass Essential Oil- Cymbopogon citratus

Delicious lemongrass

Delicious lemongrass

Lemongrass belongs to the Poaceae family (the grasses), and its genus is Cymbopogon. Other plants you may know in this family are palmarosa, citronella and vetiver (same family different Genus).

Commercially lemongrass essential oil comes from Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon flexuosis, some of my suppliers have both, and some only have one.

“East Indian lemon grass (Cymbopogon flexuosus), also called Cochin grass or Malabar grass (Malayalam: (inchippullu), is native to Cambodia, Vietnam, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, and Thailand, while West Indian lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is native to maritime Southeast Asia.” Wikipedia

Recently I have seen more C. flexuosis on offer and I wouldn’t really be able to tell the difference unless I had both bottles to sniff at the same time. There are variations in chemical constituents however if you bought either you would be fine to use them in the recipes below.

An essential oil steam in the shower will do wonders for your mind and energy levels - pic via completehealthcircle.com

An essential oil steam in the shower will do wonders for your mind and energy levels – pic via completehealthcircle.com

1. Put A few Drops Of Oil into the bottom of the Shower

This works in a similar way to just taking a whiff straight from the bottle, but if you’ve got an extra minute, it will give you a completely different experience. Your whole body will be immersed in an essential oil steam.

With a lemongrass steam in the shower expect to feel uplifted, awakened, refreshed and ready to go. Some extra happiness may also randomly occur.

Nourish your body with a beautiful oil blend - pic via redbookmag.com

Nourish your body with a beautiful oil blend – pic via redbookmag.com

2. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

“Pre Exercise Zinger”

When you need a bit of encouragement to get you going –

Lemongrass     2 drops

Rosemary         2 drops

Orange             4 drops

——————————————————————————————————————

“After Exercise Soother”

Lemongrass       3 drops

Marjoram           2 drops

Lavender           2 drops

——————————————————————————————————————

“Eye of the Tiger”

To give yourself some positive vibes for the day ahead –

Lemongrass                   3 drops

Cedarwood Virginiana    2 drops

Rosewood                     3 drops

—————————————————————————————————————–

Anoint yourself with pure essential oil blends

Anoint yourself with pure essential oil blends

3. Pure Pulse Point Perfume

In a little dish mix these oils and anoint your pulse points or chakras – 3 drops of essential oils and dilute with a few drops of carrier oil – always patch test first!

“Energy NOW!”

Lemongrass    1 drop

Basil                1 drop

Geranium         1 drop

——————————————————————————————————————

“After Work Before a Dinner Date”

Refresh and revitalize –

Lemongrass        1 drop

Petitgrain             1 drop

Nutmeg               1 drop

——————————————————————————————————————

“It’s Gonna Be a Bumpy Ride”

To help with travel sickness –

Lemongrass        1 drop

Ginger                 1 drop

Peppermint          1 drop

——————————————————————————————————————

oil burner

A classic oil burner with a candle helps to remove and transmute unwanted energy

4. Scent Your Space

In a traditional oil burner with a candle or a diffuser add 25 drops of oil

“Freedom”

Lemongrass     8 drops

Peru Balsam     9 drops

Cinnamon         8 drops

—————————————————————————————————————–

“A Night of Intrigue and Love”

Lemongrass        6 drops

Ylang Ylang         6 drops

Mandarin             6 drops

Sandalwood        6 drops

——————————————————————————————————————

“Sunny Sunday”

The perfect scent for a Sunday afternoon –

Lemongrass          8 drops

Bergamot            10 drops

Cedarwood Atlas   7 drops

—————————————————————————————————————–

Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas. See my article about intention.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

 

 

 

Peppermint Oil! An Oldie but a Goodie!

Ah lovely peppermint - pic via thebodyhut.com.au

Ah lovely peppermint – pic via thebodyhut.com.au

Peppermint essential oil is usually Mentha piperita and comes from the family Lamiacae, and the genus Mentha. A supplier of mine also offers Mentha arvensis, but really when it comes down to it the variations won’t make a huge difference to the therapeutic value for most users of oils.This family also holds many herbs like lavender, sage, marjoram, patchouli, oregano, thyme and many others. It seems as though this family of plants has been around for thousands of years going back to, at least, the Romans, the Greeks, and it is even recorded in Egyptian records. These are hardy herbs and have wonderful medicinal properties.

Please see my article Essential Oils from Herbs are Spectacular for a more comprehensive list of healing herbs. I’ll be concentrating on these herbs over the next few weeks so stay tuned.

Peppermint lollies - pic via health.com

Peppermint lollies – pic via health.com

Peppermint essential oil is one of the most used oils in the world and this is because it’s use in food flavourings. Peppermint lollies are sweet, cute and fun and for all these reasons I also see peppermint essential oil as an oil of happiness. It appeals to many people, both young and old and is an easily accessible and inexpensive oil.

A typical analysis of peppermint oil shows it is high in menthol and menthane, and these constituents are the ones that give peppermint its heat. Funnily enough this warmth or heat actually translates to a cool feeling, and peppermint could be considered and anti-inflammatory oil.

Peppermint oil is used in aromatherapy today –

* as an antidote for nausea and travel sickness

* to help calm symptoms of irritable bowel (via products that contain peppermint oil)

* as a pain relief for muscles and nerve pains

* as a decongestant for the sinuses

 

Most people love peppermint - pic via www.milkandhoneyherbs.com

Most people love peppermint – pic via http://www.milkandhoneyherbs.com

I use peppermint oil –

* in a steam inhalation to relieve a headache (it really works well) and sinus headaches and pain

* and in any blend of oils to relieve pain – menstrual pain, muscle pain, aching limbs, arthritis pain

I would not use peppermint oil in many body oils, but I have added it to a blend for a client with psoriasis and eczema and it seems to cool her itchy skin.

Peppermint is good for pain!

It’s also great to clear your mind, wake you up and to make you feel refreshed. It will even do that when you have a good quality mint in your mouth.

Try these recipes –

Take a huge whiff to change your focus in seconds

Take a huge whiff to change your focus in seconds

1. Open The Bottle and Take a Huge Whiff

Peppermint will help with a headache, sinus congestion and a tired mind.

2. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and  “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

“Calm Down”

For itchy skin or even an irritable feeling –

Peppermint   1 drop

Lavender       4 drops

Patchouli       2 drops

—————————————————————————————————————–

5. Scent Your Space

In a traditional oil burner with a candle or a diffuser add 25 drops of oil

“Happy la la”

Clear the air and make room for some happy vibes –

Peppermint        8 drops

Orange             17 drops

——————————————————————————————————————

Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas. See my article about intention.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

 

 

 

 

Star Anise, Aniseed and Fennel Essential Oils – What’s the Diff?

Star Anise pic via es.wikipedia.org

Star Anise pic via es.wikipedia.org

Have you ever wondered if these plants (and essential oils) are the same? The one thing they have in common is that they all have an aniseed-licorice scent about them, however they are all different plants and the essential oils are different too (if only slightly). Fennel tends to be the more used essential oil in Aromatherapy but I’m sure some therapists out there may prefer Anise.

Aniseed (or Anise)

Pimpinella anisum - pic via blog.metmuseum.org

Pimpinella anisum – pic via blog.metmuseum.org

Pimpinella anisum comes from the Umbellifrae (also called Apiacae) family, like fennel. It is very similar to fennel in its scent and has some similar molecules. The plant is also very similar to fennel too – with the flowers making “umbrels” in their innate design (hence the “Umbellifrae’ family). Fennel has more yellow flowers and aniseed flowers are white. The stories of aniseed and fennel both go back to ancient Rome and I love this quote from Botanical.com:

“Mustacae, a spiced cake of the Romans introduced at the end of a rich meal, to prevent indigestion, consisted of meal, with Anise, Cummin and other aromatics. Such a cake was sometimes brought in at the end of a marriage feast, and is, perhaps, the origin of our spiced wedding cake.”

It is high in anethole which represents the highly distinctive scent, and Salvatore Battaglia reports the typical analysis as:

85% trans-anethole (a possible dermal irritant)

2.29% cis-anethole

0.94% acetoanisole

0.58% anisaldehyde

0.58% safrole

0.18% linalool

0.17% a-pinene

0.07% camphene

0.01% B-pinene

Even throughout history this seed has been used for coughs, colds, digestive disorders and it’s used for the same thing today. It is said to a better expectorant than fennel too.

Fennel

fennel flower

fennel flower

Foeniculum vulgare essential oil comes from the seeds like the anise bush and as you can see they are very similar plants. One again the Romans used these seeds for digestion and the Greeks thought it a slimming herb because of its diuretic value. I definitely use fennel to release excess water and also watery emotions in my clients. I often use fennel with juniper and use this combo in clay masks for cellulite too. It seems to be a softer more nurturing oil than aniseed as it is lower in trans anethole. Here’s a typcial analysis from Salvatore Battaglia’s great book “The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy”:

64 – 69.2% trans-anethole

19 – 21.6% fenchone

3.9 – 6.5% methyl chavicol

1.8 – 3.3% a-pinene

1.2 – 1.7% limonene and 1,8 cineole

0.1 – 0.3% anisic aldehyde

0.5 – 0.8& myrcene

Fennel has slightly more uses as it can be used for cramps during menstruation and to help the flow of milk in lactating women. I use this oil energetically as a self nurturing oil as it’s warm and inviting scent can help you relax and release.

Star Anise

Star anise - pic via www.tajagroproducts.com

Star anise – pic via http://www.tajagroproducts.com

Illicium anisatum is part of the Schisandraceae family and you can see the little seeds within the star formations. Sometimes known as Japanese anise it is often mixed up with Chinese anise (Illicum verum) which is very similar. One of my suppliers offers Illicum verum var. Hooker only but I haven’t used it. In my practice I need to be able to use more commonly trialled and investigated oils and that’s why fennel is the best out of the three. Of course in perfumery it’s a different story as you would primarily selecting oils for their scent rather than therapeutic value. The closest I can find in a typical analysis is from “THE ESSENTIAL OIL OF ILLICIUM ANISATUM LINN. by W. B. Cook, A. S. Howard” and they state:

18.1% cineole

10.1% linalool

9.8% methyleugenol

6.8% α-terpenyl acetate

6.6% safrole

and a sesquiterpene hydrocarbon of unknown constitution (7.2%) and they say

“The composition of this oil differs widely from that of the commercially used star anise oil obtained from Illicium verum Hooker. The most striking difference between the two oils is found in the anethole content, which constitutes 88% of the commercial oil but only 1.2% of the oil here investigated.”

So there you go.

Basically if you are going to use an aniseed scented oil go with fennel.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

Clove – A Healing Oil and Spice

Cloves - interesting little things pic via articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Cloves – interesting little things pic via articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Aw look at these cute little things! They are classified as “calyxes” and come from a larger pod from an evergreen tree hailing from Indonesia, Sri Lanka and probably India too and other tropical islands like Madagascar. Originally they were only found on the “spice islands”  The Maluku Islands or Moluccas, and were traded worldwide in the 1600’s and  1700’s by the Dutch East India Company. They are basically part of the flower and when we get the clove it has been dried. This tree belongs in the same family as eucalyptus another scented tree along with guava and feijoa too!

By now you would have caught on to the fact that spices have a rich interesting history and clove is no exception. The Greeks and Romans used the clove bud as did ancient Chinese medicine where they were used as a warming tonic, and a stress relief treatment also great for high blood pressure. Records even show the use of cloves in 3BC in China where they were chewed to freshen the breath. In Ayurveda cloves are used for swelling, nausea and to help prevent colds.

We all love a good story and Wikipedia claims

“… the clove trade is also mentioned by Ibn Battuta and even famous One Thousand and One Nights characters such Sinbad the Sailor is known to have bought and sold cloves.”

Go Sinbad!  Arrrrrrrrr the spice trade of the high seas!

So now we come to modern aromatherapy and the use of clove oil today. Even if you haven’t used it yourself, you may now of clove oil’s use in reducing dental pain. It has an analgesic effect and I often put some clove oil in a formula for a client if they are experiencing physical pain.

Clove buds on the tree pic via namastenutritionist.com

Clove buds on the tree pic via namastenutritionist.com

* It is great to reduce swelling and inflammation in arthritis and in muscles too.

* Vapourised to kill air-born germs to prevent the spread of viruses – due to its high content of eugenol which is a strong antiseptic. Eugenol is also found in cinnamon, allspice, bay, basic, rose, jasmine, and carnation plants and oils.

* As a warming tonic to the souls who is unhappy or depressed

* As a calming agent to the digestive system

Clove is one of those oils that you don’t want to overdo so be mindful when blending. Try these recipes –

sniffing bottle of oil

sniffing bottle of oil

1. Open The Bottle and Take a Huge Whiff

Clove – relax, unwind, calm nausea, warmth

2. Nourishing Body Oil Blend

For a coat of your body use 3 teaspoons of carrier oil in a little dish and, add 7 – 8 drops of essential oil.

***** Always put the drops of essential oil into the bottle or dish first, then add the carrier oil. It gives the scents time to create a synergistic fusion.

For a 50ml bottle of oil add 25 drops and see my articles “Ratios for Blending Essential Oils – A Reminder of the Basics” and  “Aromatherapy – It’s Easy as 1 2 3”

“Soothe Me”

A formula for helping pain and swelling from arthritis –

Clove         2 drops

Lavender   2 drops

Fennel       2 drops

Marjoram   2 drops

————————————————————————————————————————————–

“Chill”

A chill out blend –

Clove                2 drops

Frankincense    3 drops

Orange             2 drops

—————————————————————————————————————————————

Happy blending and remember to use your intention when you are creating your formulas. See my article about intention.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

Melissa – Pretty Name, Pretty Scent – A Wonderful Essential Oil

Melissa officianalis

Melissa officinalis

Melissa is also called lemon balm. It belongs to the same family as lavender, marjoram, peppermint, sage, patchouli, rosemary, thyme, oregano and more. You can see how the leaf looks similar to some of the other herbs too, and it’s sometimes difficult to tell them apart just from a photo.

Like many plants that create essential oils, Melissa extract is used in Naturopathy extensively for calming nerves and anxiety. This is what the essential oil is good for as well. It has a lemon scent but is more refined than lemongrass, more subtle than lemon and more delicate than any lemon scented eucalyptus or tea tree.

many lemon scented plants exist in nature

many lemon scented plants exist in nature

And once again this plant has an interesting history in healing through the past centuries. The standout landmark for this lovely plant is traced back to the Carmelite Monks of France during medieval times, but this magical herb is recorded as far back as 550BC with the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus – and ancient Greek city now in Turkey. Then we have the founders of modern medicine talking about this herb; 40—90 AD with the Greek physician Dioscorides, and with the Roman naturalist and philosopher of the same time, Pliny the Elder. Thank goodness there are really brainy people who have looked back through ancient records and delivered the information to us.

So it seems as though this gorgeous little herb has the healing powers of the universe within its little green leaves.

Back to the Carmelite monks……… or was is the nuns of another Carmelite origin in the 1200’s? Melissa has been noted way back to the 800’s as a herb of great healing properties, and it seems as though the healing water made with melissa originated in the 14th century (or even earlier) but became more well-known when the Carmelite friars were granted patents by the kings Louis IV, V and VI of France under the name “Eau de Melisse de Carmes”. During these times the herb water was both drunk as a tonic and used as a cologne to wash away the stench and dirt of the streets – and the stink of the general population who did not wash frequently! The balm water also contained other herbs and was used as a panacea. Both original recipes of Benedictine and Chartreuse (the liqueurs from monastic origin) contained melissa but not sure if they do now.

Chartreuse

Chartreuse – a lovely green herbal colour with over 100 ingredients

Our beautiful melissa lost favour as more herbs and plants were discovered for healing but it is still prized in Naturopathy and Aromatherapy today as a soothing balm for the emotions. In Aromatherapy we use melissa for –

* uplifting emotional states in depression

* soothing anxiety

* on the skin as an anti-viral – topically for cold sores

* vapourised in a room of sickness to help with nausea and to limit the spread of a virus (it seems that a lot of the lemon scented plants have a great anti-viral effect and I’ve always recommended vapourising lemon in the home if you have a sick person to reduce the spread of the virus or bacteria)

* on the stomach to reduce cramps

melissa flower - pic from dr.hauschka.com

melissa flower – pic from dr.hauschka.com

Melissa – also called balm and lemon balm – is best used to soothe the soul, mental anguish and to inspire happiness. Just take a whiff straight from the bottle.

It is a very expensive oil so you will probably find it in a 3% dilution ready to use straight from the bottle as a perfume, anointing oil and skin treatment for lesions. For more info see my article for more info on 3% blends in jojoba.

I hope you love melissa as much as I do!

copyright suzannerbanks 2013

Nutmeg – A Spice Oil of Mysticism and Intrigue!

Nutmeg - Myristica fragrans

Nutmeg – Myristica fragrans

Just look at this gorgeous pod of deliciousness!

The red, almost brain-like cover is what mace is made from. The nutmeg we know and love, and use in cooking is hidden underneath. Isn’t nature wonderful? The colours are divine and the nutmeg seed is protected by layers of cellular material. This seed is part of the whole pod which is actually the fruit of this evergreen tree.

The nutmeg tree

The nutmeg tree

Like many spices and spice oils, nutmeg has a rich history spanning, in the very least hundreds of years, and probably even more. Originating from the Banda Islands, north of Timor and west of Papua New Guinea, the trade of this wonderful spice is traced as far back as the middle ages in Europe. You can imagine how long before this the islanders would have used this amazing plant.

In the 1600’s the Dutch East India Company ruled the spice trade and the beautiful islands. They staged a nasty takeover of the islands to absolutely rule and control the supply of nutmeg to the world. When the Brits took over they transplanted many of these nutmeg trees to other islands under British rule and because of this Grenada actually produces 20% of the world’s nutmeg supply. They even have an illustration of the nutmeg on their flag.

The flag of Grenada

The flag of Grenada

Our modern history is quite brutal really. Thank goodness we are now in a time of rapid evolution – the best time to employ essential oils to get us all to the next level of peace and harmony.

The essential oil of nutmeg is steam distilled from the seed and it is high in a-pinene (alpha pinene, b-pinene (beta pinene) and sabinine (also in black pepper oil); with many other constituents including camphene. We know that camphene (and other types of camphor molecules) are warming and stimulating constituents – and so is the oil of nutmeg.

The traditional uses of nutmeg include:

* to ease the symptoms of colds and flu

* as a tonic to warm the body

* as a treatment for all things digestive – to stimulate appetite, to treat nausea and vomiting and to generally stimulate the digestive fire

* as an anti-inflammatory agent especially in the treatment of arthritis and swelling of the joints

* to warm aching muscles and joints

The nutmeg spice is known as an hallucinogen due to a chemical constituent called elemecin, which Wikipedia claims is similar to the properties of mescaline. According to Salvatore Battaglia (an aromatherapist and author of a great book called “The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy”), this is lost in the distillation process and is not present in the oil.

Isn’t it interesting that the red mace covering of the seed looks like a brain – and that the seed can effect the brain, inspiring whacky mind visions!

nutmeg

nutmeg

I use this oil as a connection to spirit – as an awakening oil of the mind and the higher chakras. I find nutmeg oil to be expansive on all levels of our existence – the physical, the emotional, the mental and the spiritual. And just the fact that it’s called “myristica”, I always think of this oil as an agent of attaining our mystical existence, and accessing our mystical guides. I use this oil when I need to connect to universal intelligence.

Try these recipes:

1. Pure Pulse Point Perfume

In a little dish mix these oils and anoint your pulse points or chakras – 3 drops of essential oils and dilute with a few drops of carrier oil – always patch test first!

“Sweet Release”

Allow divine guidance to enter your world

Nutmeg        2 drops * patch test first as nutmeg could be sensitising to the skin

Orange         1 drop

————————————————————————————————————————————–

2. Scent Your Space

In a traditional oil burner with a candle or a diffuser add 25 drops of oil

“Intergalactic Love”

Reach out into the universe with love

Nutmeg        10 drops

Rosewood     8 drops

Mandarin       6 drops

————————————————————————————————————————————–

Remember to use your intention when you are blending, it will add to the creation process and also be an exercise in using your intuition.

copyright suzannerbanks 2013